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Dogs

Dog Friendly Holidays

Dogs are part of the family and some of the best holiday memories can be of happy times with pets, walking and playing with them on a beach, or taking them for long countryside walks, or simply sharing time together without the stress of a busy work schedule. If you also have children then having happy memories of holidays shared with your pets can be so important for you and your family in future times.

On a Dog website we know how important holidays with pets are and have had many holidays with our dogs over the years, we now have lovely memories and photographs of our dogs on holiday and continue to enjoy time with our dogs that now share our lives.

Posie on the beach | a dog

Beach Holidays with a Dog

Dog on beach

Beach holidays with a dog bring some of the best memories as most dogs just love being on the beach. While a beach holiday with a dog may not be ideal if you are staying in holiday accommodation as most dogs manage to carry sand back home with them, it also gets everywhere in the car.

If you are used to taking your pets on beaches to walk or play you probably already accept that you will have a problem with sand and have either accepted this, or come up with a strategy to keep it to a minimum.

By drying your dog with a towel, walking them until they dry out and the sand can be easily brushed off, having a dog crate in the car or in the house until the sand falls off. We take several old blankets and towels on holiday to help keep our pets comfortable and dry.

Dogs in Cars

Dogs in cars

For most dogs a trip in the car is a great experience and they just love going places, for other dogs it is a miserable time and either anxiety or other issues gives them a less than pleasant time in the vehicle. If your pet has anxiety or is prone to travel sickness it is better to discuss this with your veterinary practice to choose the best solution for them. Ideally you should start preparing your dog for a long journey by getting them used to being in your car, making car trips fun (to a forest walk for example) and not just to the vets which may not be the best memories for your dog. Build up good memories of going places they enjoy.

If your dog does suffer genuine travel sickness then medication is available to reduce the symptoms from your vet, or online. You can also help by withholding food before a long journey and by keeping your dog in a position in the car that stops them looking out of the side windows. You may find that a car dog carrier is helpful as well as a dog seat belt.

Dogs and Car Safety

Keeping your dog out of the front of the vehicle is very important and most car insurance policies will be void if the dog causes a distraction and you have a car accident. To ensure that you do not have any problems with the law in the country you are driving in we recommend that a physical barrier is put between the dog and the driver, a car dog guard is one of the easiest methods to keep you legal, safe and insured while travelling with your dog in the car. Many people find that having their dogs in the rear area of the car is best and a dog guard can keep your dog safely in the car. An alternative is to use a dog travel carrier which allows you to control when your dog gets out of the vehicle when you stop when you open the rear door or boot.

When travelling with a dog always make sure they have access to water, and give them adequate toilet breaks. If possible take them for short walks on a lead (as you do not want your dog to run off while on a journey) every couple of hours. Never leave dogs in a car alone even in cloudy weather as cars can quickly overheat within minutes, this will cause stress in your animals and in some cases your pet can die from overheating.

Dog - our collie Jip

Dog training

In all dog training situations, the golden rule is never to hit your dog, use rewards as a way to train and improve dog behaviour, never punishment. A simple “NO” using a stern voice is the best way to tell your dog that they have done something you do not like, or to correct behaviour. When correcting a dog’s inappropriate behaviour, you need to remember that if you hit or smack an animal, they will not understand why you are hurting / smacking them.

By rewarding good behaviour and ignoring bad (where possible) you will find that your dog will quickly learn to do what you want. The reward system can be using positive words, “Good Dog”, “Clever girl / boy”, “Well Done”, spoken with enthusiasm. Some people use a clicker with a small and tasty treat to reward “good” behaviour. or simply giving the dog a tasty treat from a treat bag they carry with them all the time they are out with their dog. Most dogs love an affectionate clap / cuddle and this can be incorporated into training.

Dog

Dogs are very easy to train as they are very intelligent animals who aim to please people. While many dog trainers will offer this advice, it is often difficult when you try and put it into practice with your own dog or puppy. In many cases the problem is the person, that is you, and not the dog. This may simply be due to a lack of knowledge, patience or experience and this can be fixed by reading up on the subject (buy a book, or watch a video) or ideally taking your dog along to a dog training class where your dog will also learn to meet and get on with other dogs.

The best time to train your dog will be when they are a puppy. You may find that your vet will offer puppy classes and while these may be more geared towards socialising your puppy with other young dogs, it is a great step towards training the puppy with simple commands, such as sit, stay, heal, come and leave. By encouraging your puppy to understand and obey these simple commands will make your life a lot easier and also help keep your dog safe in the home or outside on a walk.

With many of us choosing to adopt an older dog you can find that your new pet may have missed out on the essential aspects of puppy training and socialisation. By being patience and kind, you will find that most dogs will easily pick up good behaviour even when you adopt an older dog.

Buying a puppy

Buying a Puppy

Most of us that love dogs also love having a puppy, they are delightful and fun to have yet they do offer challenges as they will often go through destructive phases often linked to teething and simply their desire to explore the world – with their teeth. We have been lucky to have had two puppies and have experienced the destruction of shoes, furniture and electrical equipment, as well as one of the puppies basically eating the seats of a car when I foolishly left him in the car while out shopping. They did grow out of this destructive stage; it did however push my patience to the limit. Forewarned is forearmed and you can try and keep your puppy safe and your furniture in one piece by using indoor puppy pens as well as getting them used to sleeping in a dog cage at night. By making sure that they have safe dog chew toys (rope toys) and other items they can safely chew it will help the puppy not chewing items that are valuable or dangerous. One of our puppies chewed through the electrical cables linked to a stereo system, somehow she did not get hurt, the stereo was ruined.

Puppies

Buying a puppy can be great fun and the source of much excitement for all the family. It can also be costly so you do need to take care, use your head and keep your heart under strict control. The reason for this is that is due to the unfortunate fact that the puppy industry does have a bad reputation due to scammers, poorly run and illegal puppy farms and people who steal animals to sell. While most of us will be moved when we hear of a puppy needing a home on social media, just remember not all of these adverts will be legitimate or from a reputable breeder.

Sheltie - Shetland Sheepdog

Never buy a puppy unless you can see the mother with them, ideally also see both dogs to get an idea of their temperament. Good natured dogs will usually produce puppies that will also be good natured. Never buy a puppy out of the back of a van, or in a pup. Always see the home environment and make sure it is legitimate.

Sadly, many puppies bred by people who run puppy farms will be ill and poorly bred, the mum has sometimes not been well cared for, will not have been exercised properly or fed correctly. They may have been kept in small cages all their lives. Why would you want to pay money to criminals who have no interest in their animals, or in the breed. The puppies from these illegal puppy farms will often be ill when you get them, or have genetic problems that can cause them to have short and painful lives. If you buy such a puppy you may end up paying hundreds or thousands of pounds in veterinary bills only to see your puppy or young dog die young, or have permanent and expensive medical needs. While most of us would want to help a puppy, buying from criminals is not the answer.

So where do you buy a puppy? If you want a specific breed then buy from a registered dog breeder. Go online to the official breed club in your country who will have a list of reputable breeders near you. A good idea is to follow the Kennel Club website advice on this. While not every reputable dog breeder will be registered, many of them will be. Most will also provide evidence of their puppies having medical checks and may also offer insurance on the puppy.

Just want a puppy, breed not important.

If a breeder will not allow you to see the mum and pups together in their normal living area (not just brought into a room for you to see) or does not meet the Kennel Club website advice on buying a puppy then you need to be strong and walk away from the purchase. This can be very hard to do after seeing a puppy, it is however the best thing to do. Whether you are spending £400 or £4000 it is just the start of your ongoing costs to look after your dog, by ensuring you are buying a healthy and well bred puppy your costs will be ongoing. If you buy a poorly bred or ill puppy to start you can easily end up spending a lot more and still end up with a broken heart.

If you are not looking for a specific breed and just want a dog then consider approaching your local or national dog rescue charity. While you may need to wait longer to get a puppy with these charities you will be helping rehome a dog that needs a home and people to love them.  You will also need to expect a visit to ensure you and your living situation is suitable for keeping a dog, and especially a puppy. Some dog rehoming charities will only rehome puppies with people who have had previous experience of looking after a dog. If you do get turned down as not being suitable, instead of being annoyed consider carefully the reasons given to you and see if you can change your circumstances before going out and buying a puppy.

Often puppies will not be rehomed with families that have very young children, and for good reason. Children sometimes do not behave well with young animals and this can lead to behavioural problems with the puppy / young dog. If you are given advice not to have a puppy please consider waiting until your family situation changes. The rehoming centre may suggest an older dog that would better suit you and your family.

Collie

Adopting a dog

With thousands of dogs (and cats) each year in dog rehoming centres there is always a wide range of dogs looking for new homes. When you decide to bring a dog into your home and make them part of your family then please consider adopting a dog rather than buying one. Dog rescues are very welcoming and they will do their best to match a dog to your needs. They also do rehome puppies so if your heart still wants a puppy you can always contact your local dog rescues to find your puppy.

When adopting a dog or a puppy from a rescue centre you will be asked to pay a fee towards the cost of the animal. This cost does vary depending on the rescue centre / charity involved and their website will usually tell you the costs involved. You will find that it is considerably less than paying for a puppy. The charges go towards the medical treatments of the dog being spayed or neutered along with other medical needs at the time of rescue.

You can find details on dogs available and your local rescue centres on the following well known animal rescue websites, or do a search on Facebook for a rescue group near you.

Other website resources

These are just a few of hundreds of groups and charities that work towards helping animals and animal welfare.

Our Long Legged Parsons Jack Russell was a rescue from PADS

Fostering a dog

Dogs that are taken into animal rescues and kept in kennels sometimes get very stressed by the experience and I still remember seeing one our dogs for the first time in a kennel. His behaviour was not good and had put off people from rehoming him over several months. My wife saw through the hyperactive dog and knew he was the wonderful dog that he was. Nervous dogs like this are often overlooked by people when they visit the rescue centre and for these dogs, fostering, that is placing the dog within a home rather than a kennel, can make all the difference to the dog’s behaviour. A fosterer provides a safe and secure home for an animal that is in need of a new home. Dogs in this situation often feel less threatened than in a kennel, they are not surrounded by other dogs and the noise around the kennels. In this way they get over the trauma of being rehomed and get to know and trust people again, possibly for the first time.

Dogs in foster homes are still looking for new homes and this is part of the pleasure of fostering, seeing the dog going off to their forever home. It may takes a few weeks to several months before a suitable home is found and in that time you have the task of helping the dog learn new skills, to walk properly on a lead and to socialise with people and other animals.

If you feel you have the patience and love to give to an animal that needs a new home then approach your local animal rescue centre or contact one of the larger, national, animal welfare charities to see if they can use you as a fosterer.

If you do not feel you have the time to be a full-time fosterer then you may simply want to help by volunteering at an animal rescue, helping walk and exercise the animals in their care, or help with fundraising.

Adopting a dog from abroad

If you follow dog rehoming twitter feeds and Facebook for rehoming animals from outside the UK then you will appreciate that animal welfare standards are often less in some other countries. Cultural differences sometimes mean that animals can be looked upon as utilitarian rather than as a companion animal. The pictures of animals that have not been looked after properly can be heart breaking and we often wonder what we can do to help.

Obviously, the easiest solution is to help by donating money to animal rescue groups working abroad. Another way is to adopt one of the rescued animals. A word of warning, just make sure that the website / social media pages are legitimate before sending money and where possible use PayPal for any money sent.

Often these animals have already been brought over to the UK and placed in foster homes prior to permanent homes being found for them. While you heart may tell you to adopt a dog from abroad I would also say to use your head to make sure you are firstly suitable to take on the responsibly of one of these animals, and that any dog you want to adopt will also match your needs.

Where the animal sanctuaries are out with an area where they can bring dogs to the UK then they are nearly always requiring money to help feed the animals in their care and to pay for veterinary treatments. You can help by sending money, by giving your time to fundraise. For the more adventurous you may find that you can spend a holiday working within the animal centre to help look after the animals in their own country.

Animal Behaviourist

Dogs do sometimes develop behavioural problems, even dogs raised from a puppy. While you can with a bit of reading, or watching videos learn how to change unacceptable behaviour in your pet in most situations, it does take perseverance and patience. We do not all have the temperament to learn the skills and tools to improve our pet’s behaviour, sometimes it is just too complicated or deep seated for us to do on our own. This is where a pet behaviourist can and should be used to help both you and your pet.

A dog behaviourist will usually have formal qualifications and years of experience, and while they may not be cheap, they can often make the difference between having your dog rehomed or in extreme situations put to sleep. If you feel you need to use a behaviourist to help change your dog’s behaviour then ask your vet for recommendations. They may even have someone within their practice that can provide this service.

Another way to access a dog behaviourist is through your local dog training classes. While the individuals running training classes may not have formal qualifications, they will have many years of looking after and training dogs. Maybe all that is required is a different approach to your pet and you can learn this is a social environment with other people learning to train their dogs.

Looking after older dogs

Older dogs need to be loved and cared for and we can do this in a number of practical ways. By taking them on less demanding walks, being sensible about the amount of running around they do, by helping them into / out of the car so that they do not need to jump down on limbs that may be slightly arthritic, by providing comfortable bedding for them to sleep on. I am sure you realise the list goes on, it simply comes down to giving your older dog, more time and affection as they get older.

Older dog

Older dogs may need more reassurance and you can do this by talking to them more, showing physical signs of affection by clapping and cuddling them – just let them know you adore and love them. Older dogs may lose some of their senses such as hearing and eyesight leading to feeling insecurity in the dog.  Your vet will be able to give you advice on how to look after your older pet and may recommend yearly tests to check out for any underlying illness or conditions. When medical needs are identified early, they are often easier to treat on an ongoing basis.

Older collie

Ideally if you can make sure your older dog is at the correct weight and is on a good healthy diet, along with regular exercise, will help keep you dog healthier for longer.

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